Manassas Cover Image

About the Author: Upton Sinclair

Upton Beall Sinclair, Jr. was an American author who wrote close to one hundred books in many genres. He achieved popularity in the first half of the twentieth century, acquiring particular fame for his classic muckraking novel, The Jungle (1906). To gather information for the novel, Sinclair spent seven weeks undercover working in the meat packing plants of Chicago. These direct experiences exposed the horrific conditions in the U.S. meat packing industry, causing a public uproar that contributed in part to the passage a few months later of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act. The Jungle has remained continuously in print since its initial publication. In 1919, he published The Brass Check, a muckraking exposé of American journalism that publicized the issue of yellow journalism and the limitations of the “free press” in the United States. Four years after the initial publication of The Brass Check, the first code of ethics for journalists was created. Time magazine called him "a man with every gift except humor and silence." In 1943, he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

Sinclair also ran unsuccessfully for Congress as a Socialist, and was the Democratic Party nominee for Governor of California in 1934, though his highly progressive campaign was defeated.


Other books by Upton Sinclair

 
Manassas Cover Image

Find the best price forManassas

A Novel of the Civil War by

Goodreads rating: 3.62

Paperback, Published in Apr 2000 by University Alabama Press

ISBN10: 0817310444 | ISBN13: 9780817310448

Page count: 414

This ambitious Civil War novel centers on the moral dimension of the conflict as it traces a young Mississippi boy's conversion from pro-slavery Southerner to abolitionist Union soldier.

Allan Montague, born on a Mississippi plantation about twenty years before the Civil War, has grown up with slavery and considers it natural. When his father moves to Boston for business and takes the boy with him, young Allan carries a knife given to him by his cousin to use in killing abolitionists.

The first abolitionist young Allan meets in Boston is Levi Coffin, the reputed founder of the Underground Railroad. In this first of many meetings with historical figures, Allan forms a friendship with Coffin, who eventually takes him to hear a speech by former slave Frederick Douglass. Douglass's powerful words cement Allan's transformation into an abolitionist--a transformation that will lead him back to his Deep South home with the hope of freeing slaves and eventually back to the North and the fateful Battle of Manassas.

Kent Gramm, author of the introduction for this new edition of Manassas, calls the novel "a modern version of the morality play," with the United States as the central character. "The real story," he writes, "is the moral phenomenon of the Civil War." It is a powerful book that deserves to be revived, read, and studied.

 

 


Compare New Book Prices for Manassas
Retailer
Price
Delivery
 
Total
 
...

SEARCHING FOR PRICES...

Categories for this title

Compare book prices with SocialBookco. Get by at the best price. This book is for ISBN which is a copy .